More Insight into Gender Equality and Health

Today The Lancet has published a series of papers on on Gender Equality, Norms, and Health. This is a collection of five papers, led by Gary Darmstadt of the Stanford King Center on Global Development and his colleagues, that provides a new analysis and insight into the impact of gender inequalities and norms on health, and the opportunities that exist within health systems, programmes, policies, and research to transform gender norms and inequalities. The series of papers highlight that potential advances in health and development are thwarted by systemic neglect of gender by health institutions across the globe.

They also show that the same systems that perpetuate these injustices against women and girls also harm men and boys and gender and sexual minorities. As a result they affect a broad array of health outcomes for all people. Through this series of papers the authors hope to inform the global health community of effective actions to recognise and transform gender inequalities, and their intersections with other social inequalities—including those related to age, race/ethnicity, religion, and socioeconomic status.

Their ultimate goal is to catalyse actions to enable all people to live to their full human potential, by upholding human rights and improving health and well-being for all.

You can access the papers and commentary around them at

https://www.thelancet.com/series/gender-equality-norms-health

You are likely to hear a lot more about this work via mainstream media in the next few days so if it sparks your interest and you want to avoid the hype, remember to go back to the source.

So why does this matter to older people?

Ageism and sexism in health services affects the quality of care, patient-provider interaction, patient self-perceptions, and the planning of health education programmes for older women. The stereotyping of older women in health care encounters, although often subtle, can have far-reaching effects on the health status of older women (Sharpe, 1995)

That’s without discussing ageism towards women in the workplace, media and elsewhere….

Advertisements

One thought on “More Insight into Gender Equality and Health”

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s