Why are UK Citizens Overwhelmingly Negative About Getting Old?

‘The Perennials’, a study carried out in partnership between IPSOS MORI and the Centre for Ageing Better, reveals that just three in ten (30%) of UK adults say they are looking forward to later life. Half (50%) say they worry about getting old.

The Report called “The Perennials: The Future of Ageing” looks our ageing societies and the challenges and opportunities this presents. The Ipsos Mori study was global in that it was conducted and illustrates attitudes to ageing across 30 different countries.

Their research shows that, globally, there is a great deal of negativity towards later life, with financial and health concerns prevalent. However, much of this negativity is propagated by a media that does not do enough to portray later life as a time of potential. It is, therefore, perhaps, little surprise that when describing those in old age, people commonly reach for terms like ‘frail’, ‘lonely’.

However, as Ben Page, the Chief Executive of Ipsos MORI states this fails to do justice to the full diversity of experiences in later life.

The over-50s now command nearly half of all spending power in many countries.
People in their later years are increasingly packing their life to the full. For many, their reality doesn’t necessarily align with the labels the media are giving them. They are not slowing down but taking on new challenges, roles and responsibilities. Those with money to spend are smart about spending it.

They’re not digital natives but they are more connected than we give them credit for. They’re not withdrawing from life, but demanding more from it and from their societies.

Yes, old age is a time of great hardship and there are very real issues such as poverty,
isolation and ill-health that needs urgent attention. However, there is also another side of later life – one that we don’t hear about often enough because it doesn’t fit with ageist and lazy media stereotypes.

For a breath of fresh air visit the Report website at https://thinks.ipsos-mori.com/the-perennials-the-future-of-ageing/

To download and read the full report CLICK HERE

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A Framework for Older Peoples’ Workforce Development and Educational Requirements

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Well, I am late posting again this week although I’ve got a list of very good excuses that I won’t mention.

There was only one topic that I wanted to share anyway and that’s because it is a cause I was certain to support. On the 12th of February BGS Nurse and AHP Council released a position paper on the professional workforce development and educational requirements of those supporting the health and care of older people in the UK.

They believe that all health and care staff and professionals require knowledge and skills to enable them to work effectively with older people an assertion that is in line with recent position papers from the British Geriatric Society (2018) on the Primary Care of Older People which calls for increased education and training.

Their work identifies 5 levels in the workforce where they feel specific knowledge and skills are required. I would suggest taking a look, particularly if your career lies predominantly in this sphere of care. Their position statement can be found HERE

I’ll pick out one thing because it is so important!

All health and social care focused undergraduate curricula, where graduates will work with older people, the focus on the older population must be recognised as the golden thread that runs throughout each programme. Education curricula regulators need to respond to this call as do Higher Education Institutes who must make it a priority to review their course content to reflect this new horizon of population demand and long-term supply need. The BGS cannot reinforce enough the urgency for providers to respond now and ensure fit for the future undergraduate curricula are in place.

Three years of Blogging about the need for this and still waiting for transformation.

 

Social Care in Crisis

England and the rest of the country have now waited over a year for the Government’s long-promised Social Care Green Paper for it only to disappear amidst the current Brexit blizzard.

Parts of the new Long Term Plan for the NHS in England are dependent on securing realistic funding for social care and maintaining and increasing investment in public health. Neither of these looks particularly likely at the moment. The failure to address these concerns now means that local authority funding cuts have seen social care services stripped back to the bare minimum in most areas. Things are so bad that Age UK estimated that 54,000 people – or 77 people a day have died while waiting for a care package in the 700 days since the Westminister government first said in March 2017 it would publish its social care green paper.

Age UK has also said tightening eligibility for council-funded social care meant 626,701 people – 895 a day – have had requests for social care refused since March 2017. More than a million older people had developed an unmet care need in that time, such as needing help with washing or dressing.

Meanwhile, ministers continue to dither over these long-awaited plans and have failed to produce any additional funds admitting that delays to the publication of the paper and institution of the new funding arrangements are in part because of Whitehall’s overwhelming focus on Brexit.

Caroline Abrahams, charity director of Age UK, said:

“These tragic new figures demonstrate just how many older people are now suffering from the government’s failure to act decisively on social care. No one can say whether some of those who have died might have lived longer had they received care, but at the very least their final weeks and months might have been more comfortable and their families’ lives made easier had they been given more support.”

The charity said its helpline received calls daily from people struggling to get a care package in place, often putting great strain on their health and causing stress for loved ones. To read the full article form Age UK Click Here

Age UK  have also started a Care in Crisis Campaign which we should all support. They suggest contacting your MP using their pre-prepared letter.

If you live in England I think you should be doing that at the very least!

More Insights into Global Ageing

On Universal Health Coverage Day, which fell on the 12th. of December 2018, HelpAge International and the AARP Foundation launched Global AgeWatch Insights 2018, a new report that analyses older people’s right to health in the context of current demographic, epidemiological and health systems transitions.

As the global population ages, health systems need to adapt to ensure older women and men can realise their right to health. How much they need to be changed can be illustrated with just a few statistics.

In 2018, the global population aged 60 and over surpassed one billion, and it continues to rise in almost all countries around the world. This move toward an ageing population is accompanied not unsurprisingly by a shift towards a rise in the number of people dying from non-communicable diseases (NCDs).

Of the 41 million annual deaths caused by non-communicable diseases globally, 32 million occur in low and middle-income countries, which is changing the demands being placed on these healthcare systems.

The key findings of this new report worth noting

  • Some healthcare systems are reliant on data which should inform the planning and delivery of health services systematically excludes older people.
  • Older people are prevented from accessing health services by cost, lack of transport, discrimination, and inadequate training of health workers.
  • Although women are living longer, they live more years in poor health, and with disability, depression and dementia.

As with all their Global Age Watch reports this one is accompanied by some great infographics including the one I have chosen to highlight below.

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